The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) just approved a list of 500 companies to fly drones. Until recently, few organizations had this privilege, and only a dozen used this technology—the most well known being Amazon to test new options for package delivery.

Drone technology is fairly new and companies are years away from utilizing its full potential. We can clearly see, however, that companies are exploring a range of use cases. Aerial MOB, for instance, is using drone tech for closed-set filming. Aerial Intelligence HD is using drones to monitor natural resources. Aerial Optics uses drones for event photography. Aviation Technology is creating augmented real estate listings. The list goes on.

With all of these new uses, and new approved companies, we expect to see some tech jobs arising as a result.

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The way we consume and enjoy music continues to change in the digital age, as we’ve moved from tapes to CDs, to MP3s, to fully streamed audio. Many of the top music streaming services give you access to a vast library of music songs from your favorite artists. At their core, these different services all have fairly similar offerings and features, though each does have some notable perks and quirks. Here’s a quick look at the major players in the song streaming world and what sets them apart.

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90s Tech Toys are Alive at Modis

by Collin Webb on July 23, 2015

With a Clinton and a Bush vying for the White House, and a Jurassic Park film dominating the box office, it seems that generational nostalgia for the 90s is capturing the hearts and minds of people everywhere. Recently, we asked our friends on Facebook what their favorite 90s tech toys were and how they would update them for 2015. We received a lot of great answers, but the following four really stood out!

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The latest regional employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics has been released and the IT industry is adding more jobs than most industries around the country. Month-over-month employment in the tech sector increased in 32 states. This is no surprise following the strong national jobs report released at the beginning of the month that showed a significant drop in the IT unemployment rate. Professional, Scientific and Technical Services, a sub-sector of the Professional and Business Services industry, is currently showing an unemployment rate of 2.9%. The last time we saw a rate lower than that was 7 years ago.

Outside of the tech sector, month-over-month job additions occurred in 31 states, however, 17 states saw job losses. Year-over-year numbers were a bit more encouraging as 48 states saw employment increases. These stats further signify the continuing momentum for IT and solidify the sector’s spot as a top performing industry.

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During the recession, employer competition for talent was at an all-time low, and companies could get away with hiring talent at lower salaries. Today, market demands for top tech talent have surged—and salaries are rising as a result. To stay competitive, companies need to be prepared to offer strong salaries. In fact, it’s non-negotiable, given the number of opportunities that top employees have in front of them.

As a Hiring Manager, you see this trend every day. Recognizing the need for higher wages, you’re prepared to make your case and fight the battle for better pay. The challenge, however, is that your c-suite may not see eye to eye with you in meeting this need. After all, salary increases will bump up your organization’s line item expenses.

What you need to do is focus on ROI, not costs. Share the following trends with your company leaders to help them see why they should pay more for top tech talent.

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NYSE Goes Down, IT Workers Become Heroes

by Trey Gunn on July 8, 2015

The NYSE resumed trading after being down for nearly four hours on Wednesday. On a day mired by technical glitches, the New York Stock Exchange found itself on the losing end of an unprecedented technical malfunction that occurred at 11:32 a.m. EST. All outstanding orders at the time of the malfunction were cancelled. Trading on the exchange resumed at approximately 3:10 p.m. EST.

Several federal agencies and the White House released statements indicating that the problem was not a result of an act of cyber terrorism, an initial concern in the context of the several coincidental system failures around the country, including (but not limited to) United Airlines’ system failure (reportedly caused by a faulty router) and the Wall Street Journal’s homepage failure (most likely a result of traffic volume related to the NYSE failure). All of the agencies continued to monitor the situation well into the afternoon and are expected to conduct investigations to pin down the exact cause.

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